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When a child has food allergies, Halloween can be a scary time. The small candy wrappers often do not contain lists of ingredient, making it nearly impossible to make sure your little one is eating a treat that’s safe for them. When your child has an egg, milk, nut or soy allergy, how do you make sure they’re safe and can have a fun Halloween experience?

The Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) organization started the Teal Pumpkin Project, which encourages people to place a teal painted pumpkin outside their door if they’re offering non-food treats, such as stickers or small toys, to trick-or-treaters.

It’s a small step to make sure all children can be a part of the fun on Halloween, and it allows the parent to know their children will be safe without a bag full of candy they may or may not be able to eat safely.

If you’re interested in participating, it’s very simple! Place a teal painted pumpkin outside your door to let trick-or-treaters and their parents know you have non-food items, and pass them out like you normally would. Some kids may ask for them knowing they can’t have dairy, soy or nuts. It's best to keep the non-food treats in a separate bowl or container, so extra safety from cross-contamination. FARE has printable materials available for you to display to let others know there are non-food items available at your home.

This article was originally published on September 30, 2015, and was updated on September 7, 2016.

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July 31 is national heatstroke prevention day. On average, 37 children die in hot cars every year in the US. 87% of those are ages 3 and younger. Vehicular heat stroke is largely misunderstood, with the majority of parents believing they could never forget their child in the backseat of a car. Even the most cautious parent can be thrown off by a change in routine, lack of sleep, stress or fatigue.

2/3 of the increase in temperature happens within the first 20 minutes, and a child’s body overheats 3-5 times faster than that of an adults. Even with windows cracked, the temperature inside a car can reach 125 degrees in minutes.

To help make sure you keep your child safe, we’d like to give you some ideas to always check for baby.

Make it a routine to open the back door of your car every time you park (at work, home, grocery, etc.) to make sure no one has been left behind. Put your purse, bag, cell phone or something else important you always need in the backseat to remind yourself to check every day, every time. Send your significant other a photo of your child inside daycare every day when you’ve dropped them off, or send them a photo at home once you’ve picked them up and have them inside the house.

Additionally, make sure your child cannot get into a parked car. Keep vehicles locked at all times, even if they’re parked in the garage or driveway. Keep car keys and garage remotes up and out of reach of your children. Ask your neighbors, friends, family and guests to do the same.

If your child goes missing, immediately check all vehicles- inside the trunk and front and back seats carefully, even if they’re locked. A child may lock the doors after entering on their own and may not be able to unlock them.

If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. Call 911 immediately. If the child seems hot or sick, get them out of the vehicle as soon as possible.

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After a horrific event like a mass shooting or terrorist attack, parents find themselves trying to make sense of the event, all while trying to figure out what, if anything, they tell their children. Each child has unique needs in a crisis. Often, it will depend on their age, if they knew anyone affected by the crisis and how much they have been exposed to the news. Allow your child to give you clues about how to meet their needs, and remember that all children are different. One may ask you many, many questions, whereas another may only want extra hugs and to watch a movie. Both of these reactions are OK!

Ask your child what they’ve heard. Allow them to tell you what, if anything, they heard. Once they’ve told you, ask them if they have any questions. Keep your answers straightforward and direct. In general, it is best to share basic information, no graphic or unnecessary details. It’s important to understand that they’re asking you questions because they need someone they trust to listen to their questions, accept their feelings and be there to support them while they work through their emotions. Staying silent on the issue won’t protect them from these events, as much as we’d prefer for them to not have to hear about what’s happened.

While it may be possible to limit your child’s exposure to media within your home, it is difficult when you’re not within your own home, or if your child is older and has access to a cell phone, social media or news accounts.

Even your youngest child will hear about tragic events, and it’s better for them to hear information from a parent or caregiver than another child or general media. Additionally, younger children may respond with forms of dependence, like acting clingy, refusing to sleep alone and experiencing separation anxiety. They may also throw temper tantrums or wet the bed. An older child may respond with anxiety, sadness, risky behavior or outbursts at school.

Feelings of sadness, fear and confusion are normal reactions. However, if your child seems very upset and unable to recover from fear, starts having trouble in school or home, or isn’t able to get up and go to school, you may want to contact your child’s doctor for additional advice. Additionally, if you are concerned they need more information or support than you’re able to provide, you can reach out to their teacher, school counselors or doctor for additional support.