For years, women have relied on pads or tampons during their period. But, recently menstrual cups have become more popular and more widely available. A menstrual cup is a flexible cup that is designed for use inside the vagina during your period to collect the menstrual blood. Menstrual cups are usually made of medical grade silicone, but some can be made from latex.

You can use a cup throughout your entire cycle, some users only need to empty it once every 12 hours, and some empty it more often on their heavier days.

A menstrual cup is a more expensive up-front purchase than a box of tampons or pads, however it can last for up to ten years, providing you with a significant cost-savings, and less waste. You also get more time between changes.

It’s also surprisingly easy to use. If you currently use tampons, or have used a diaphragm, you should have little trouble learning to use a cup. It folds up to a size similar to a tampon for insertion. When properly inserted, the wearer shouldn’t feel it at all, much like using a tampon.

There are some potential drawbacks to using a cup. Some women aren’t comfortable inserting them or have fit problems. That’s OK! A menstrual cup isn’t for everyone, but it’s an alternative for women looking for something different.

If you have any questions about a menstrual cup, ask during your next routine gynecological exam. Your provider can help you determine if you should give a menstrual cup a try and can help alleviate any concerns you may have.

Did you know that 1 in 3 women suffer from or will develop a pelvic floor disorder during their lifetime?

Pelvic floor disorders are problems related to bladder, bowel and sexual function. They include different types of urine leakage (incontinence) or bladder control problems like going frequently, getting up at night to urinate, or getting strong, uncontrollable urges to urinate. Pelvic floor disorders also include problems related to the bowels such as accidental loss of gas or stool. Finally, a condition known as prolapse, which is a feeling that the pelvic organs (bladder, uterus, vagina or rectum) are bulging or falling out, is also a pelvic floor disorder.

When you find out you’re “expecting” there are so many decisions to make. Will you find out the gender before birth? What names do you like? What items do you have and what items do you need? And, perhaps most importantly, who will deliver the baby? For most women, this means choosing between an obstetrician-gynecologist and a midwife.