It is becoming more common for mothers who are nearing the end of pregnancy to request an induction of labor early, but waiting until natural labor occurs is good for both the mother and the baby in a healthy, uncomplicated pregnancy. A pregnancy is considered full term between weeks 37-40. Even though 37 weeks is the earliest point of a pregnancy being considered full-term, there is still so much growth and development that is happening in the last couple weeks of pregnancy.

 

Adolescence, simply defined, is the state or process of growing up… sounds easy enough. One’s body knows what to do: eat, sleep, drink and one day, as if by magic, it wakes up and is different. But, what about those other changes, the ones we’re not so eager to discuss; changes in mood, acne, menstruation. Is this normal? Though the simple answer in most cases is yes, there are many topics and questions a healthcare provider familiar with adolescent women’s health can help to address.

While there is no set age or reason to begin routine care with a women’s health professional, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends adolescents establish care between the ages of 12 and 15. By initiating this relationship early in one’s reproductive life, patients and physicians are more easily able to bridge communication barriers, particularly regarding the sensitive issues which arise in the course of care for adolescent women.

A major health concern for women after menopause is the risk of heart attack and stroke. Throughout the last decade, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been used to treat menopausal symptoms and help prevent cardiovascular disease. Now, there is a large body of evidence that has shown that women who take HRT are also at a lower risk of heart disease.

In the first 5-10 years after menopause, estrogen is actually effective in preventing cardiovascular disease. It is in this group that HRT can make a difference. This concept was discovered in the first and only prospective, double blinded, placebo controlled study of HRT in older women, called the Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHI). This was a controlled study designed to test the hypothesis that HRT is beneficial in preventing heart disease in women. Primarily studied were older women, well past menopause.